July 20, 2016

With Plex for Sonos you can now browse and play your entire Plex music collection on any Sonos device, right from the Sonos app.

Great news.

Ocean Ramsey and a whale shark

It’s not often you can say the pretty woman in the bikini is the second most beautiful and graceful thing in a video but I can honestly say it’s true in this case. I’d love to go diving with these amazing creatures.

Kottke:

Rebroadcast of Cronkite’s coverage of the Apollo 11 Moon landing starts in 10 minutes here.

If you are too young to have seen it live, watch it here. Or, relive the incredible memories of this day, 47 years ago, when mankind first stepped on the moon.

UPDATE: “it was originally posted in 2009”. Dammit. Never mind.

Mashable:

Sometimes, displaying our most beloved books on a shelf just doesn’t cut it. And when it comes to doing justice to the extent of our bookwormery, loud and proud is the way forward.

Pippa Branham of Liverpool, UK, decided to go all out with her love of books and paint her staircase with her and her husband’s preferred reads.

This is really cool. If I had any painting or design skills or even stairs, I’d give this a try.

ChefSteps recently introduced Joule, a small and easy-to-use sous vide tool, the first of many of the products planned by Young and his team of over 50 chefs, scientists, photographers, writers and engineers.

It’s not often you hear of a person with this combination of attributes. Interesting interview.

One of the two oldest methods of applying color to web pages, named colors remain very useful in web design and development today. Consisting of 149 distinct keywords (shown above, with their hexadecimal equivalents) CSS named colors have a few special features

The decision to drop a paywall can provide insight into how a news organization’s “values intersect with its commodification strategy, its technology design, and its brand identity” as outlets of all stripes are still deciding how much their reporting should cost.

This discussion has been going on for two decades.

Modi’s cabinet on Wednesday is likely to approve a three-year exemption on local-sourcing requirements for foreign single-brand retail companies with “cutting-edge technology,” according to the people, who asked not to be identified due to rules for speaking with the media.

This is great news, although I’m not sure what happens after the three-year exemption.

Scientific American:

Jim Papadopoulos has spent much of his life fascinated by bikes, often to the exclusion of everything else. He competed in amateur races while a teenager and at university, but his obsession ran deeper. He could never ride a bike without pondering the mathematical mysteries that it contained. Chief among them: What unseen forces allow a rider to balance while pedalling? Why must one initially steer right in order to lean and turn left? And how does a bike stabilize itself when propelled without a rider?

As kids, we “counterbalanced” by instinct. When I was learning to ride a motorcycle, the explanation of “steer right, go left” confused the living daylights out of me.

Macworld:

There’s no shortage of word processing software in the world, but few have the cult following that Scrivener does. Long available for OS X and Windows, it’s finally ready to be downloaded by anyone who owns an iOS device for $20.

I’m not much of a writer so I’ve never used Scrivener but many of the writers I know swear by it and have been waiting impatiently for this app for their iPads.

No matter how you look at it, that’s impressive.

Until now, that blue checkmark next to your Twitter account name could only be awarded by Twitter, using a mysterious internal award process.

Now that’s changed. For the first time, people can apply for that blue checkmark themselves.

Interested? Start here.

Reminds me of The Sneetches (skip to 48 seconds in – that’s where the great Dr. Seuss writing kicks in).

UPDATE: Be sure the “Why” field has less than 500 characters and does not contain a link. Tripped me up.

This is a bit hard to follow, but it is a pretty ingenious scheme. In a nutshell, the scammer sets up a pay phone line, a phone number that people have to pay to use. They then use that number as a verification number with Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. and take an action which causes that number to be called.

By automating the process, they bring in a nice little wave of money. That’s the theory, anyway. This was pieced together by a security researcher who raised the issue to get companies to put barriers in place to prevent this hack.

20 years ago, Steve Jobs buys an airline ticket through a custom web app

Steve Jobs showing off NeXT WebObjects, buying an airline ticket on the web, something that was a brand new experience at the time.

My favorite part is when Steve calls United Airlines to verify his purchase. Ever the showman!

[H/T Steve Hayman]

This sounds like an exaggeration, I know, but take a look at this resume. Not effective in a traditional sense, since it can’t be printed and won’t fit in with most job search engines, but still, great job.

Quartz:

Just call 917-ASK-NYPL, and a live librarian will try to answer your question, using vast archives collected over 120 years.

And:

Set up in the 1960s, the line is manned by nine librarians and information assistants. The team gets a lot of calls from people who want to fact-check things they’ve heard on the news, says Caballero-Li.

What I find amazing is that this service still exists, has not been overwhelmed with demand. Fascinating read.

This is pretty interesting, the kind of chart that bears some digging. iOS 5 is clearly the champion, with eight betas spanning more than 120 days.

Variety:

Garry Marshall, who created some of the 1970s’ most iconic sitcoms including “Happy Days,” “The Odd Couple,” “Laverne and Shirley” and “Mork and Mindy” and went on to direct hit movies including “Pretty Woman” and “The Princess Diaries,” died Tuesday in Burbank, Calif. of complications from pneumonia following a stroke. He was 81.

Marshall went from being TV writer to creating sitcoms that touched the funny bones of the 1970s generation and directing films that were watched over and over: “Happy Days” helped start a nostalgia craze that has arguably never abated, while “Mork and Mindy” had a psychedelically goofy quality that catapulted Robin Williams to fame and made rainbow suspenders an icon of their era. “Pretty Woman” likewise cemented Julia Roberts’ stardom, while “The Princess Diaries” made Anne Hathaway a teen favorite.

“Happy Days” star Henry Winkler credited him for launching his career, tweeting “Thank you for my professional life.”

Garry Marshall was a huge influence, sending out waves far beyond the specific content he created.

July 19, 2016

The new episodes of Making A Murderer will provide an in-depth look at the post-conviction process of convicted murderer Steven Avery, and his co-defendant, Brendan Dassey, as their respective investigative and legal teams challenge their convictions and the State fights to have their life sentences upheld.

Like many people, I was glued to the TV set watching this series.

Gawker Media LLC founder Nick Denton faces personal bankruptcy after a U.S. judge refused on Tuesday to extend protections shielding him from liabilities resulting from a lawsuit over the invasion of privacy of former professional wrestler Hulk Hogan.

This story completely ruined Denton.

Fraser Speirs documented his experience of rolling out 90 iPads. Impressive.

How old school floppy drives worked

Really interesting and wonderfully nerdy video about how floppy disks works. Kids, ask your parents what a “floppy disk” is.

Version 2 sports the world class, professional photo editing that you users of Camera+ for iPhone have been enjoying via The Lab. But the iPad version takes photo editing to a new level by supporting selective brushing of the various edits and filters. And those of you who own an Apple Pencil will appreciate it even more because we’ve also added Pencil support, enabling you to get very fine, precise control over brushing with it.

Camera+ has a lot of tools and is certainly worth a look if you are into photography on your iPad.

There are some great new features in the latest version for iOS including:

  • Quick Selection Tool – this is an awesome and super accurate new selection tool that lets you swipe over areas to select them.
  • Magnetic Selection Tool – this tool snaps precise selections around objects and is really fun to use.
  • Selection improvements – there’s also a ton of improvements to the overall selection experience (including an Invert Selection feature).

I use Pixelmator as my only image editor and love it.

Interesting story.

Twitter Inc said on Tuesday it had signed a deal with the NBA to stream exclusive non-game programing, pushing deeper into sports streaming as it seeks new ways to attract users.

Twitter also signed a deal with the NFL this year. I’ll have to wait and see what kind of content comes out of this deal, but on the surface, I’m not sure this appeals to me.

“Due to the wide array of available Android devices, we are targeting our support to a select number of Android devices to continue improving our overall Salesforce1 for Android user experience,” the company said in the support document.

Translation: Android is so fucked up, we were forced to take steps to make it work for us.

512 Pixels:

There will be a day where some of my old machines will stop working. There will be a day where none of them work anymore.

As sad as that will be from a hardware perspective, it’s devastating in terms of preserving software. Old operating systems are sealed inside these machines. A dead Mac is really just a beige — or Bondi Blue — sarcophagus for the software stranded on its internal disk.

Preserving the textual contents of a document is one thing, but how do we preserve the experience? How do we save the applications and the non-textual data?

Great piece by Stephen Hackett. Absolutely worth reading.

The Japan Times:

In an ultimatum, Iranian officials asked iPhone manufacturer Apple Inc. to either officially register in Iran or have its products banned, a local news agency reported Monday.

“If Apple will not register an official representative in Iran within the next few days, all iPhones will be collected from the market,” Tasnim News Agency quoted the director of Iran’s anti-smuggling office as having said on Sunday.

More than 40 million Iranians are using smart phones, including millions of iPhone users, whose devices are often imported into the country by smugglers.

And:

For anti-smuggling purposes Iran has started a project, running under the president’s office, to ban smuggled mobile phones. The scheme, which will start later this week, will require all mobile phones to be registered with Iran’s telecommunications user database. Any that are not will not be able to be used.

Hard to know what to make of this. Given past events, is it wrong to be skeptical here?

The Verge:

Google’s grand plans for a futuristic new campus in the North Bayshore district of Mountain View, CA may finally become a reality thanks to a new real estate deal struck with LinkedIn. According to the Silicon Valley Business Journal, the two tech companies came to an agreement on a property swap that puts to rest a longstanding feud over lucrative current and unused square footage in Silicon Valley. Google paid $215 million for the swap, while LinkedIn paid $331 million, the report states.

In a nutshell, Google’s plans for their campus were put on hold last year when the Mountain View city council voted to award a huge tract of land to LinkedIn instead of Google. With the swap, Google now has the property it needs to push forward.

Politics aside, follow the various links to see pictures and video of this planned campus. To me, it’s like a science fiction fantasy. It will be interesting to watch this unfold. Looks like Apple, Facebook and Google will all have their grand palaces.