Transferring SD card data to iOS, fast

Jason Snell, Six Colors:

When I’m traveling with only my iPhone and iPad, I can record audio on an external device—an SD-card recorder from Zoom, usually—but how do I get those files onto my iOS device? iOS can’t see the contents of a standard SD card.

And:

It’s still a little bit silly that, now that iOS has a file-management app, you still can’t plug in a mass storage device via a USB adapter and copy files off of it directly.

And this from John Gruber:

Apple even makes an SD card reader for iOS devices. It just seems downright wrong that it only allows you to import photos to your camera roll. Clearly a connected SD card ought to show up as a source in the iOS 11 Files app, right?

To me, the inability of iOS to handle external drives, SD-cards, etc., is a barrier to an iPad becoming a first class computing citizen.



  • JimCracky

    for me ths is the big reason I can’t even begin to recommend iPads to pros.

  • ignobilitor

    The Kingston MobileLite G3 referenced in the article is a great solution. Regardless of whether or not one feels that Apple should make this easier, the MobileLite solves the problem.

  • edsug

    YOU WILL USE THE CLOUD – Apple

    • Heos Phorus

      ONLY, OUR CLOUD SUCKS, EVEN WHEN WE LET YOU PAY FOR IT, MWAHAHAHAHA – the same

  • Heos Phorus

    i guess it‘s kind of a security feature – having imported files getting processed, indexed and classified by ios’ file system on the device probably creates another attack-vector.

    still, even with that limitation, icloud drive and the „files“ app could be much better. as could a lot of other „physical media“-less features that should in theory make it easier to mitigate the lack of an old-school file-system. like „air drop“ (which, surprisingly, very often doesn’t work) or „mail drop“ (i‘ve yet to send a file between 3 and 5 gb without the mail app getting stuck or crashing. i‘ve also recently been asked to delete an online mail-drop attachment. nope.)

  • Heos Phorus

    i guess it‘s kind of a security feature – having imported files getting processed, indexed and classified by ios’ file system on the device probably creates another attack-vector.

    still, even with that limitation, icloud drive and the „files“ app could be much better. as could a lot of other „physical media“-less features that should in theory make it easier to mitigate the lack of an old-school file-system. like „air drop“ (which, surprisingly, very often doesn’t work) or „mail drop“ (i‘ve yet to send a file between 3 and 5 gb without the mail app getting stuck or crashing. i‘ve also recently been asked to delete an online mail-drop attachment. nope.)

  • Heos Phorus

    i guess it‘s kind of a security feature – having imported files getting processed, indexed and classified by ios’ file system on the device probably creates another attack-vector.

    still, even with that limitation, icloud drive and the „files“ app could be much better. as could a lot of other „physical media“-less features that should in theory make it easier to mitigate the lack of an old-school file-system. like „air drop“ (which, surprisingly, very often doesn’t work) or „mail drop“ (i‘ve yet to send a file between 3 and 5 gb without the mail app getting stuck or crashing. i‘ve also recently been asked to delete an online mail-drop attachment. nope.)

  • GlennC777

    I’ve felt this way all along. The lack of a good user-facing file management scheme, app or otherwise, was one of the really good points Android and others could make against iOS. It has seriously hobbled usability since the very first release and still does today.