iPhone X review – a week in Italy

Nanda Kusumadi:

We take it for granted these days, but it’s amazing when you step back and reflect that what you have in your pocket is a device capable of fulfilling the complete photography journey. From planning your shot, to shooting it, post-processing it, and then to sharing or printing it – it’s all right there at the palm of your hand.

I’m not a huge fan of the actual photos taken – I’ve been to the places shot and the photos seem washed out, colour-wise, but that may be the photographer’s editing – but the detail in the shots is remarkable.

I’m headed to Australia for three weeks on Friday and this post actually has me considering whether or not I will commit Professional Photographer Heresy and not bring my Nikon D600 DSLR and shoot only with the iPhone X. Gulp.



  • CapnVan

    Don’t do it! How often are you going to get to Oz?

    If you’re going to experiment with heresy, save it for someplace you’ll be back to.

    • This will be a first and only trip to Australia for me.

      Nd I get your point but one of the things I like to do as a photographer is challenge myself. Shooting only on an iPhone X would certainly be a challenge. 🙂

      • I’m not sure the DSLR is so necessary. i sold mine and shoot with Olympus MFT cameras for my personal work. Still using the Canon D1X at work. And it’s a great camera, but I’m too old now to carry a full frame kit on any kind of extensive travel.

        But, my Olympus in three lenses has the equivalent of 14-300mm 2.8 in three very small lenses. And that makes me ask about your trip to Australia, not whether you can live without a DSLR, but can you live without very wide and long lenses? What they call a telephoto in the iPhone X is only that by a few mm equivalents. It’s pretty much in the normal range. You want to play Cartier-Bresson? Shoot the whole time with the “telephoto” lens and get your decisive moments with that!

        • Well, if I was bringing the DSLR, I’d only bring/have the one lens – a 24mm-120mm. If I bring the mirrorless M1, I’ll have several – a 9-18, a 12-40, a 75, and a 75-300. Lots of options there.

          • GlennC777

            Carrying a D600 with a fairly big, heavy lens, the camera will inevitably be a major focus: handling it, stashing it safely when not in use, having hands free to use it; and getting enough use out of it to justify having it along.

            I can see why you might want to just use a phone. Thats what I did on our vacation last year and I haven’t regretted it.

            Edit: also, with that particular lens, you’re not taking advantage of most of the potential DSLR advantages: wide angle, narrow depth-of-field, long telephoto, etc. The X with pano, crop, dual lenses and portrait mode would almost duplicate what the 24-120/4 can do, and actually exceed it in some areas.

          • The good news is, the D600 is my favorite and go-to camera. I’m very familiar with it and have lots of gear from Luma Loop and Peak Design to help me “manage” it. So that’s not much of an issue.

            And my photo “style”, if I have one, works great with that one lens.

          • GlennC777

            You’ve gotta to with what works for you of course. Those are the things I notice when I’m hauling a full DSLR; that the psychic and physical focus on having and using it does have a cost. To me it’s all about what the purpose of the trip is. And just taking it doesn’t mean you have to use it every day, obviously.

          • I’m a “professional photographer”, I shoot almost every day. 🙂

          • James Hughes

            After reading through all the posts, bring both. That way you won’t second guess yourself. Have fun, Australia is great.

          • Which is why I have a full Olympus kit for Alaska in three weeks! Pen F, and E-M1 Mark II, 12-40 2.8, 30 1.4, 40-150 2.8, 60 Macro, 1.4 converter.

  • Just did a week in France. Left the Canon 6D at home and only used my iPhone X for the trip. There’s something nice about not having all the extra weight for the camera and lens. I’ll grant the iPhone took some great photos. Not a 100% substitution for a DSLR, but getting close and closer.

  • rick gregory

    Unless the Oz trip is for professional reasons, leave the DSLR home would be my take. Back in the days before smartphones I saw so many people walking through beautiful places that they seemed to be seeing through the viewfinder of their cameras. I always found that sad.

    Obviously, you’re into photography far more than I but if it’s really the only trip you anticipate making there, I’d vote to experience the trip vs worrying about images.

    • Shawn, do you wander around face down in a camera?

      When I’m bringing my camera somewhere I usually keep my face out of it, but I try to be really aware of what a camera might see as I look around. It forces me to See with a capital S, if that makes any sense at all. I look for photos with my eyes first. If I see something I want to capture, I do.

      I’m curious if real photographers do the same.

      • rick gregory

        Yeah, I didn’t mean to imply he did that or was planning on it but taking the big camera etc does seem to bias people to looking for photos vs experiencing the area. This isn’t wrong or right, but it’s a different, er, experience than being in the moment. Obviously different strokes, etc.

        • And I didn’t mean to imply you were saying he couldn’t experience it. Your question just triggered mine is all, and it’s something I’ve been curious about. 🙂

          Personally, when I’m in photo seeking mode I’m kind of hyper-aware of the experience of the area. That gives me hints where to look and if there’s a moment that can be captured. Some moments just can’t be captured, they need to be simply experienced, and when you find one of those you need to just relax and soak it in.

          • rick gregory

            And I didn’t mean to infer that you implied the inference on that other thing… wait, what’s the topic?? 🙂

            I keep flashing back to being in the Accademia in Florence, looking at the actual David by Michelangelo and seeing people not looking at and taking in the sculpture but looking for the best angles to shoot it at, etc (like the world needs another photo of the David). I mean, I saw people do that their entire visit, then walk out, never taking time to soak in the art itself.

          • Agreed. My ex wanted to see it and leave inside 2 minutes. I stood there for 45 minutes. 🙂

          • rick gregory

            well that explains the ‘ex’ part 🙂

          • LOL One of many explanations. The biggest was, she couldn’t spell “monogamy”. 🙂

          • From what little I caught online, she also seemed to put the “psycho” is “cyclone.”

          • James Hughes

            Sorry to hear it, mostly because I can relate.

          • No sorrys needed. It was a long time ago and she’s been relegated to a punch line nowadays. 🙂

          • I forget. I didn’t mean to imply I remembered.

          • “Some moments just can’t be captured, they need to be simply experienced”

            This is absolutely brilliant and crucial to know when this is happening. My experience as a photographer lets me know this instantly and allows me to forget about trying to fight with the camera to take pictures of those things I can’t capture and to just let go and “feel”.

          • Meanwhile, my wife is trying to take a selfie. But she’ll learn. 🙂

        • GlennC777

          To me, “seeing” the way the camera sees, and seeing the way I want to see to best experience a place, are two very different things. For one thing, the latter incorporates the other senses as well. I’ve found the former takes me out of the experience and puts me into the camera lens instead.

      • It makes perfect sense and that’s the way I do it and the way I teach my students. I tell them to visualize the shot before they ever lift the camera to their eye.

        • Cherylgleclaire

          <

          blockquote>Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this. On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it !da170d: ➽➽ ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleCashStarCareerPartTimeJobs/get/hourly ★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫:::::!da170uuuuu

    • Mary

      <

      blockquote>Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this. On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it !da250d: ➽➽ ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleCashSaleCareerPartTimeJobs/get/hourly ★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫:::::!da250uuuuu

    • Vera

      <

      blockquote>Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this. On tuesday I got a great New Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it !da251d: ➽➽ ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleCashNewsCareerPartTimeJobs/get/hourly ★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫:::::!da251luuuu

    • Ethel

      <

      blockquote>Google is paying 97$ per hour,with weekly payouts.You can also avail this. On tuesday I got a great new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this last four weeks..with-out any doubt it’s the most-comfortable job I have ever done .. It sounds unbelievable but you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it !da225d: ➽➽ ➽➽;➽➽ http://GoogleHomeLifeCashJobsOpportunity/simple/work ★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫★★✫★✫:::::!da225lu