Another day, more hysterical anti-Apple bullshit from Bloomberg

Michelle Fay Cortez, Bloomberg:

If a person falls asleep with the iPad2 on the chest, the magnets in the cover can “accidentally turn off” the heart device, said Chien, a high school freshman in Stockton, California, whose father is a doctor. “I definitely think people should be aware. That’s why I’m presenting the study.”

Defibrillators, as a safety precaution, are designed to be turned off by magnets. The iPad2 uses 30 magnets to hold the iPad2’s cover in place, Chien said. While the iPad2 magnets aren’t powerful enough to cause problems when a person is holding the tablet out in front of the chest, it can be risky to rest it against the body, she found.

Gee, maybe that’s why the leading maker of defibrillators tells patients NOT TO STICK MAGNETS ON THEIR CHEST. The same manufacturer, by the way, “said its testing hasn’t found any risks from iPad technology when used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.”

I wonder what bizarre anti-Apple bullshit Bloomberg will come up with next. Anyone wanna take any bets?



  • http://twitter.com/Tame_Geek Mark Thomson

    “iPhones may cause blindness when the corners are thrusted in to the face”

    • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

      “iPad may cause vehicle accidents when held in front of face while driving.”

  • imthedude

    iPad’s might cause cancer because someone who owned one got cancer?

  • http://diskgrinder.tumblr.com diskgrinder

    iPhone may cause discomfort when shoved up journalist’s arse

    • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

      iPhone shoved up ass may cause inappropriate erection and yellow journalism in Bloomberg writers.

      • http://diskgrinder.tumblr.com diskgrinder

        It’s arse.

  • http://twitter.com/jearle Jared Earle

    “… to avoid potential interference with the pacemaker. Persons with pacemakers: Should always keep iPad more than 15 cm (6 inches) from the pacemaker” – http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_Important_Product_Information_Guide.pdf

    • tylernol

      exactly, a known issue with pacemakers and magnets.

      • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

        No. There’s nothing in the guide about pacemakers and magnets. The issue in the safety guide is about pacemakers and wireless interference. Jared chose to omit the portion of the sentence that makes that clear, and you just agreed with him without bothering to check yourself.

        • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

          Oh, Internet and Spergtards…

        • kibbles

          Medical devices “iPad contains radios that emit electromagnetic fields. These electromagnetic fields may interfere with pacemakers or other medical devices. If you wear a pacemaker, maintain at least 6 inches (approximately 15 cm) of separation between your pacemaker and iPad. If you suspect iPad is interfering with your pacemaker or any other medical device, stop using iPad and consult your physician for information specific to your medical device. iPad has magnets along the left edge of the device and on the right side of the front glass, which may interfere with pacemakers, defibrillators, or other medical devices. The iPad Smart Cover and iPad Smart Case also contain magnets. Maintain at least 6 inches (approximately 15 cm) of separation between your pacemaker or defibrillator and iPad, the iPad Smart Cover, or the iPad Smart Case.”

          boom.

    • BC2009

      I was told that a 14-year-old discovered this for his science fair. There is no way this was a known issue with magnets and pace makers and actually included in Apple’s manual!

      /s

      • DanPierce

        She would have used Surfaces but could find no one who owned one.

    • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

      There’s nothing there about magnets AND pacemakers in that guide you linked to. It’s all about interference with the pacemaker and a wireless device. The section specifically advises:

      “Should always keep iPad more than 15 cm (6 inches) from the pacemaker when the wireless device is turned on”

      You chose to omit the rest of that sentence about turning it off. I wonder why you did that? Or does turning the iPad off also disable the magnets?

      • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

        Gods, shut the Hell up. Magnetic interference is interference. Apple cautions users regarding interference and the proximity of their Pad. There are magnets in every single fucking piece of mobile technology, or do you not know how a speaker works?

      • kibbles

        duma: eat it.

        http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/ipad_user_guide.pdf

        “iPad has magnets along the left edge of the device and on the right side of the front glass, which may interfere with pacemakers, defibrillators, or other medical devices. The iPad Smart Cover and iPad Smart Case also contain magnets. Maintain at least 6 inches (approximately 15 cm) of separation between your pacemaker or defibrillator and iPad, the iPad Smart Cover, or the iPad Smart Case.”

        …page 126.

      • kibbles
    • franksspam

      A defibrillator is not a pacemaker.

  • http://www.timdehring.com/ Tim Dehring

    Well, let’s see:

    Radiation in the iPhone causes cancer. No other mobile phone presented this issue upon testing in our (completely made-up) labs. People should be aware, that’s why I’m presenting the study.

  • beachbuoys

    What they’ve omitted to say is that Apple did this deliberately as they ‘have it in’ for anyone with a non-Apple pacemaker. It’s also been revealed that Apple are responsible for kidnapping 3 women in Cleveland.

    • http://twitter.com/colinmat Colin Mattson

      But I ate ribs and listened to salsa music with Apple!

      Man, I had no idea.

  • http://twitter.com/dohman Chris Dohman

    wow, a little sensitive to a small story informing folks about something they might want to know about?

    i found it interesting and i learned something from it, defibrillators have a magnet mode and ipad2s have 30 magnets in the cover. my guess is most people didn’t know these things. relax.

    • BC2009

      Everybody with a defibrillator knows this. It is how they teach you to disable it when needed. Using a magnet is the emergency shut off for it rather than ripping open somebody’s chest.

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        Yes but do they know their iPad has magnets? I’d think so but they may not have a smart cover, which makes it readily apparent.

        • kibbles

          …which is why Apple prints it in the user guide.

          http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/ipad_user_guide.pdf

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Don’t get me wrong, Apple isn’t wrong here. My larger point is someone is perfectly within their right to help spread the word, no matter the source.

            This isn’t anti-Apple so much as it is educating consumers.

          • adrianoconnor

            Yep, and everybody reads the user guide! I mean, pffft, I must have read my iPad user guide, umm, let’s see now, at least, at a guess, zero times. How else would I know how to use this incredibly intuitive device?

    • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

      My guess is that people who live with defibrillators are informed about how to avoid messing them up.

      Surface tablets have magnets too, right? Too bad they wouldn’t draw as much Google juice as “iPad.”

      The point of the Bloomberg article is likely stock manipulation via trash-talk.

  • http://profiles.google.com/larry.davis Larry Davis

    You’re being obtuse this time, Peter. This is a real issue that a smart 14 year old figured out (certainly with help from her dad). She is presenting to the Heart Rhythm Society this week.

    It’s not surprising to anyone in the pacemaker business, and indeed current devices are often built with a failsafe.

    It also seems Apple is aware of this as they make mention of it in their manual (though not for the magnets but the radios).

    It’s a legitimate story.

    • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

      You realize it’s in the manual, right?

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        Aside from this issue and someone pointing that out, had you read the manual to learn it?

        Point is: who reads manuals?

        • http://twitter.com/marathonmanjh James Hughes

          Okay, so assuming they now include information in the manual about the potential problems with a pacemaker and the magnets (if it fact there are any) but no one reads the manual, what good will that do? Should we now have labels on the side of all tech devices that have magnets or “something” wrong? Like cigarette boxes?

          • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

            Honestly, it probably wouldn’t be a bad idea when dealing with reasonably powerful magnets. Put it on the inner protective plastic wrap.

          • http://twitter.com/marathonmanjh James Hughes

            What I mean is how many warnings are enough though and who decides what is and is not inportant. RIght now, because of this report, this seems reasonable. What about the other health hazards? How big would this plastic wrap eventually be. Having said all that, I get your point, I am just not sure how feasible it would be.

          • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

            I hear you. I agree it’s the thin edge of a wedge, but I don’t see much else to the wedge.

            “WARNING: SEE SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO USE.”

            Then, you know, include a one sheet safety instructions: Don’t immerse in water, don’t use when damaged, contains powerful magnets. Do not use as a weapon.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Good idea.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            By no means. Apple is perfectly fine here. If iMore wrote a piece on this topic, it’d be just fine.

        • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

          I’m not saying it shouldn’t be treated more seriously, John. But we’re throwing around words like “discovered” and “presenting” for something in the ducking manual…

          Well, let’s just say I’m actually in violent agreement with you.

        • kibbles

          people with pacemakers read gadget manuals. my grand father did…because it’s important to him. less so to me.

          and yes, the ipad guide does in fact mention magnets & pacemakers.

          http://www.tuaw.com/2013/05/10/myth-killer-ipad-magnet-effect-on-defibrillators-wasnt-discov/

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Great point! Again, Apple isn’t wrong and neither is Bloomberg for highlighting it.

      • franksspam

        Do you have a link? I don’t see anything about defibrillators in the manual that was linked to above.

        • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

          No, it talks about pacemakers. I would think it would be close enough not to take the chance if you have one, though?

          I mean, there’s certainly room for Apple to disclose this more obviously. But there’s also personal responsibility at work.

      • http://profiles.google.com/larry.davis Larry Davis

        Sure I do, I mentioned it in my post. That doesn’t make the story any less legitimate.

        • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

          You know, reading my reply again I’m very confused. It seems like I was trying to reply to someone else’s post. My apologies.

    • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

      No. Obtuse is when a collection of jerkoffs pretend that Apple’s caution regarding the proximity of the iPad to a pacemaker is somehow null and void because Apple did not specifically caution against magnets being the source of interference as opposed to wireless radios. I guess it’s a meaningful distinction because magnetic fields aren’t part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Oh wait.

      Magnets. How the Fuck do they work?

      Apple says keep the iPad away from your pacemaker.

      The End.

    • LTMP

      She didn’t actually figure it out. Her project was designed to test how susceptible defibrillators are to the magnets, not if they are susceptible.

  • CAugustin

    30 magnets? I wonder where they are – I find much less points that are magnetic on my iPad, and with the Smart Cover attachted some of them should have their magnetic fields reduced. But they are powerful, so it could be a real problem. (Perhaps iPad and Smart Cover are counted together, than the number could make sense.)

  • BC2009

    BREAKING: If you blend an iPad in a high-powered blender and ingest it, it may kill you.

  • Lukas

    I think most people don’t expect their iPads to contain powerful magnets. The quote doesn’t seem like “anti-Apple bullshit” to me, it seems like “useful information that might actually help somebody with an iPad”.

    • Box of Cotton Swabs

      Page 126 of the iPad User Guide, under Safety, Handling, and Support. If I had a pacemaker and bought a new electronic device, that’d be the sort of thing I’d seek out.

      Medical devices iPad contains radios that emit electromagnetic fields. These electromagnetic fields may interfere with pacemakers or other medical devices. If you wear a pacemaker, maintain at least 6 inches (approximately 15 cm) of separation between your pacemaker and iPad. If you suspect iPad is interfering with your pacemaker or any other medical device, stop using iPad and consult your physician for information specific to your medical device. iPad has magnets along the left edge of the device and on the right side of the front glass, which may interfere with pacemakers, defibrillators, or other medical devices. The iPad Smart Cover and iPad Smart Case also contain magnets. Maintain at least 6 inches (approximately 15 cm) of separation between your pacemaker or defibrillator and iPad, the iPad Smart Cover, or the iPad Smart Case.
      • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

        The correct information shouldn’t be on Page 126 of a download only User Guide that a customer has to specifically seek out and obtain. It should be in the small print document that ships with the device.

        • Box of Cotton Swabs

          Small print document? What do you have against those with poor eyesight? And what of those who throw out all paper documentation anyway?

          Clearly the warning should be in 48pt type etched in the surface of the iPad.

          • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

            The information should be in the safety guide documentation that ships with the device is all I’m saying.

            “Clearly the warning should be in 48pt type etched in the surface of the iPad.”

            Clearly you are an idiot.

      • franksspam

        Link? Because the manual that was linked to earlier did not have this information.

    • Slurpy2k12

      You’d have to be a big fucking idiot to fall asleep with a wireless, electronic device on YOUR CHEST – any device- if you have a pacemaker. It’s very basic common sense. Also, states in Apple’s own documentation that the device should remain at least 6 inches away from any pacemaker- so this isn’t some massive “discovery”. So yeah, leaving it on your chest for 8 hours wouldn’t be the brightest idea. Then again, I’ve never fallen asleep with a tablet (or anything) on my chest, so maybe people should exercise a shred of willpower and not do that.

      • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

        Yep if you’ve never fallen asleep with a tablet, a phone, or a load of something else on your chest, then clearly nobody else should be guilty of such a heinous crime. Especially when the specific information about magnets is outlined right there on page 126 of the downloadable User Guide manual that doesn’t ship with the device.

        • kibbles

          is the guide not linked in someplace? i know on my first i-devices thats how i read their manuals — on the device.

  • http://twitter.com/DumaStudetto Duma Studetto

    Well said!

    Of course every iPad owner knows the device contains powerful magnets. Everyone knows about the magnets, and if they don’t they should get a basic education! This is just horrible scaremongering from the anti-apple brigade at Bloomberg who seem to take sadistic pleasure in posting negative nonsense every day of the week.

    I’m disgusted that this piece even got published to be honest. Praise the lord we have Loop Insight to shine a light on those in the media who make hating on Apple a part of their daily publishing routines.

    • kibbles

      get a new hobby

  • Terry Maraccini

    You all are misunderstanding Bloomberg’s mission. Since Batboy and the Weekly World News disappeared, someone has to fill the void with fabrication.

  • http://twitter.com/leicaman leicaman

    And my dad’s a particle physicist and he said that when they split atoms at the LHC, they make all the iPad users stand outside so the anti-matter won’t go undetected!

    Science!!!

  • LTMP

    “Bloomberg- AAPL’s sales of the iPhone climbed to 75 million units for the fourth quarter of this fiscal year.

    This is bad news for Apple since this massive growth in iPhone sales will leave its customer pool without cash to buy the new Mac Pro.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/macmcseboy Robin Poirier

    30 magnets? Hell no… 1 magnet in optional smart cover/case… no magnets in the ipad save for the 1 speaker… Get your facts straight