Jesus Christ, Silicon Valley

A really funny post about Google Glass.



  • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

    “I’ll say this much. I will never live another day without wearing Google Glass or something like it. They have instantly become part of my life.

    And I don’t care if you think I’m a douchebag for doing that, either. They help me live my life.” Robert Scoble – https://plus.google.com/111091089527727420853/posts/Q8PJXeWQVpb

    Edit: Oh but I ROLLLLLLLED when I first saw the picture of those guys. That was just a silly shot. I expect tons of memes use on that one.

    • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

      Wearing Google Glass is exactly equivalent to wearing a visible spy camera. Expect appropriate reactions.

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        Yeah but isn’t very spy’ish. It is more like holding your phone up and walking around. Are you recording, reading something, checking your makeup?

        I get the reactions, I have some myself, but the overreactions are hilarious.

        • lucascott

          So long as there’s a big bright camera light it isn’t spyish at all

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            I’ll be sure to put one on my S3 too. ;-)

            (yes, I’m being facetious on purpose folks; keep it light) :-D

          • kibbles

            yes, because no on in the android community ever modifies their factory configured gear.

        • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

          That’s why I said visible. I’m not saying a “glasshole” is trying to get something candid, but I have to assume they are.

          Equivalent to holding your phone up? Sort of. You can usually tell if someone’s looking at or through their phone; there’s even different postures for photos vs. video.

          Anyway. I’m convinced this is actually a negative technology, but it’s not like it’s going to go back into the genie bottle. We’re going to have to figure out how to live with “glassholes.” As fun as it might be, a free sucker punch probably isn’t an option.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Yeah, you can usually tell. Seriously though, I was being facetious.

            lol @ sucker punch. :-D

            I love it for off-hand use. At this point I could never see me walking around with it on my face every day like I do my bluetooth. Maybe for driving I would use it (directions; not very often though).

            But I PROMISE you everyone will have one use case for the camera. I’m fishing this weekend and I’d LOVE to film me bringing in a big one or not having to reach for my phone when my son does.

            I very much so look forward to owning and using Glass, or whichever eyewear tech rises to the top.

          • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

            I’m not sure. The problem with the camera is that I need to adjust my head to aim it. I think that’s probably harder than moving your hand…

            I can see people trying it, but I don’t think it would work very well.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Everything I’ve seen is to the contrary. Even those who aren’t Scoble’esque (madly in love, will never go another day without it) give the Glass props for the hands off ease.

          • kibbles

            “I could never see me walking around with it on my face every day like I do my bluetooth.”

            …this should surprise no one. groan.

  • satcomer

    He forgot to mention if some wearing google Glasses into a public reset room might get punched for it.

    • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

      ROFL!!

  • http://twitter.com/Kosmatos Odi Kosmatos

    Read Daemon by Suarez. Then come back and tell me that these won’t catch on. I feel like all of you making fun of Google Glass (disclaimer: I am no Google fan, far from it) are just not getting it. The important thing with these devices isn’t about whether or not you look like a douchebag wearing them, or if it is appropriate to wear them or not. It is if human behavior will change to accept them or not, for what they offer.

    Related: All this laughing at Google Glass (including by well respected-by-me John Gruber) sounds kind of the same as the silly attitude of people who didn’t recognize the brilliance of the iPad before and even after it came out, and even to this day.

    Finally, a quote: “you can only make money by being right about something that most people think is wrong” – a hell of a lot of people thought the iPad was “wrong” (that it should have had a PC operating system, a stylus, an SD card slot, a USB port, , etc.) but some people had it pegged to a tee before it was even announced. Seems like just as many think Google Glass is wrong. Personally, the only thing I think is wrong is that they revealed it before it was ready to go on sale within a few months.

    • Michael

      There are some differences between the lead up to the iPad and Glass

      1.) Glass is out….and some are still mocking it for the pointlessness than it is. Once iPad came out everyone, once they finally got their hands on it, gave a quick “my bad….i was wrong”. That isn’t happening here.

      2.) While the iPad was a new segment of product, it was an extension of existing tech. They did, in fact, just stretch out the iPad Touch a made a bigger version of that (with optimized software). Glass is an entirely new line of product and is trying to completely change the way people interact in a non-revolutionary way. Instead of looking down at your phone its aim is for you to slap a display on the side of your head and have you looking upward all day. This isn’t some non-obtrusive hologram……its just a tiny screen sitting front and center all the time.

      In the end the comparison to the segway is a pretty good one. When it was first introduced nerds and the like were enamored with the cool factor of it. But once it finally came out it became about as widely adopted in the mainstream as New Coke. The parallels to Glass are fairly similar. Especially when you factor in that price tag.

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        1) Many of them mocking have never used it and “out” isn’t quite true. There is a test version available, not a v1. (big differences)

    • http://www.bynkii.com/ John C. Welch

      it comes down to this: do you trust people and google at the level required for everything that a glass users sees to be recorded and available. I don’t. Not even close. Google has demonstrated, over, and over, and over, that they will only “not be evil” when they are caught.

      If they think they can get away with it, they will be the creepiest fuckers on the planet. Do I trust millions of people to have some kind of ethics about recording people without their knowledge?

      BAAAHAHAHAHAHAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHA

      HUDs have a definite value, and I can think of a gob of use cases for them. Google and the average schmuck recording every thing they see and removing the ability for you to have any form of privacy whatsoever unless there is no one within visual range is none of them.

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        Yeah, kind of like someone walking around with a smartphone and recording all of their surroundings. #creepy

        • tylernol

          difference is you know when someone is recording with a smartphone. You have no idea with the glass.

          • The White Tiger

            Except for that glowing light on your face.

            “While video is recording, a recording light pops on above the eye. Unnoticeable to the wearer, but quite obvious to the subject.”

          • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

            You don’t think a light can be disabled?

          • The White Tiger

            Not the point I’m making. I’m only saying that, from what we know so far, Glass does not come out of the box subterfuge-friendly. Many phones can’t have their shutter noise deactivated for privacy reasons, for example. We’ll have to wait and see what exactly Google does with the final product– they may prevent the deactivation of the light to (slightly) placate privacy advocates.

            Circumventing these measures is possible, of course, just as its possible someone could be wielding an inexpensive spypen to take candid photos or videos (which, personally, disconcert me more). At least there’s no sleight of hand you’ll miss here– you see a dude with Glass on his face, light or no light, and there you go. Probably better play it cool, polar bear.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Every phone I’ve used lately has a silent mode on the camera but maybe that’s just an Android feature. I got rid of my iPhone 4S so can’t confirm ‘mute mode’ as not having a shutter noise.

            With that said, can you clarify what phones fit into “many phones” (re: shutter noise)?

          • The White Tiger

            Naturally, it depends on your location. The US is more lenient than others– an attempt to require camera shutter noises in the Camera Phone Predator Alert Act didn’t go anywhere.

            Japan requires them, so even our iPhones won’t shut up when you flip the mute switch. Heck, because of Singapore’s compulsory military service, there’s a market for smartphones without cameras– until very recently, no cameraphones were allowed on-base or in military compounds, period. I’m told that’s now been changed so that they’re allowed in low-clearance areas. Still can’t take pictures, though.

            But anyway, this goes back to what I said. People will find ways to get around these safeguards (except the “no camera in you phone” thing), and yes, there’s a Cydia tweak that disables shutter noises. But if people really want to invade your privacy without you noticing, there are a metric hojillion different kinds of spycameras that will do the job so much better (and cheaper) than pastel eyeglass frames with a glowy cube that sits on your face.

            If we want to criticize something about it, we should be criticizing its questionable use cases. There’s a good article series on Engadget right now detailing the editor-in-chief’s difficulty in finding frequent use of the device.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Ah man, I’m so stuck on US it is stupid. I didn’t even think of International. GREAT point!

            Yeah, I saw the Engadget editors videos. He couldn’t find frequent/daily use but I think he saw value in it from videoing his dogs playing catch.

            I think I’d be like him though. I landed some big fish this weekend and WISHED I had this on to record the fight. Right now though…it’d be charging on my desk for the rest of the week. :)

          • tylernol

            easy to disable the light..

          • The White Tiger

            Really. Can you show me where you learned that?

          • tylernol

            either programmatically via hacking a driver, or just simply snipping the wire to the LED. Or just put some duct tape over it.

          • The White Tiger

            Haha, wow, I think we’re done here.

          • tylernol
          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Many times? Yes but you could EASILY record someone with a smartphone and them not know it. It isn’t like you’re holding a VHS camcorder on your shoulder.

            There is no visual indicator you are recording so as long as you’re not holding the phone in an “I’m recording” position…you just got away with it.

    • mikey

      At $1500 this will be more or less like the chrome book. Geeks will fawn over it, but few others. Lower the price to $500 and it may reach “pet rock” fad status. Get it to $100 and it may be adopted for specialized use, like a gaming controller. Glass is much more akin to a bluetooth headset than an iPad. While popular at first (at $99) your generally characterized as an Asshat if you where/use them outside of your car. Even the utility can’t overcome the social stigmata attached to such intrusive items.

      • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

        $1500 is purely a price to limit purchases, from what I’ve heard.

        This isn’t a released product so until next year, or whenever it launches, we can only speculate as to the prices.

        • tylernol

          I bet they will pull a Nexus Q on it this fall.

          • The White Tiger

            I would take that bet. The Nexus Q was an odd surprise at I/O, and almost an afterthought. Google has been quite vocal and proactive with information on Glass.

            We can certainly debate a release date along with its potential merits and flaws, but I do believe it is a matter of when.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            I have a Q in my living room. It might as well be a paper weight.

          • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

            Nah, they are still saying 2014 is the year. Who knows though. We’ll find out more in a few weeks at Google IO.

    • tylernol

      people thought the iPad was “wrong” because of specs.

      people think the Glass is wrong not due to specs but because of the social goofiness of it.

  • http://tewha.net/ Steven Fisher

    I think I’ve found a new favorite tech blog. Sorry, Jim. But don’t worry, I’ll still slum around here. :)

  • lucascott

    You owe me $325.91 for causing me to snort soda all over my iPad

  • http://www.facebook.com/chris.nielsen.353 Chris Nielsen

    Great read!

    Random thoughts plucked out of the glass maelstrom:

    The majority of the non-tech population will be sitting ducks for glassholes. Unaware and oblivious to the privacy being sucked out of their existence until they are exposed to it on Facebook at a most inopportune time. Don’t believe it? Ask 100 average people what a Segway is.

    The new #1 lie will become – “No of course I’m not recording this.”

    When will we see the first person riding a Segway wearing their Google glass? (Probably already happened…)

    What to call above individual – a) Dandy Douchenozzle b) ‘Way Glasshole c) The end of the world as we know it.

  • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

    I’m looking forward to hearing how professionals like air-traffic controllers can use this. I’m not looking forward to seeing this in public anywhere.