Chinese state media reverse course after Apple apology

With its rare apology, Apple Inc went from pariah to praiseworthy in the eyes of China’s state-controlled media, a lesson for other foreign firms not to underestimate the speed and power of the government press.

Just a couple of days ago Apple was under a coordinated media assault by state-run media in China over warranty issues.



  • http://twitter.com/MacsFuture Lex McFarley

    Seems you have to play the game the right way in China.

  • http://twitter.com/studuncan Stu Duncan

    Even better, Apple only apologized for not responding to the criticism quicker.

    “Sorry we didn’t tell you to shut up quick enough, government.”

    http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A//www.apple.com.cn/support/warranties/

  • Klangoso

    In my eyes it makes more plausibele the “far-fetched”, “5.5″ theory in the article you linked in march/30 (http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2013/03/28/apple-china-negative-press/).

    Exactly the fact that an “apology”, in quotes, meaning it really isn’t, was enough that makes me think that’s all about saving face.

  • Intrinsick

    Before: “unparalleled arrogance” , “dishonest”, “greedy” After: “worth respect”, “conscientiously”, “we approve”

    The Chinese government treats its public like they’re fucking idiots. Do they honestly think people are going to fall for this kind of blatant attempt at manipulating public opinion? After the gaffe with the 820 Party even vaguely savvy net users knew they were being played here.

    It’s a game they can’t keep playing without there being consequences. You can only distract the public from the real problems by directing their anger at foreigners – be it Japanese fishermen, or American tech companies.

    • http://blog.charlespinker.com/ Charlie

      And it’s a game Apple seems willing to play

    • http://mangochut.net/ mangochutney

      It’s not that easy.

      Something similar happened in Australia where Apple made amends after being called out in public.

      Yes, China’s media is almost entirely state controlled, but we’re only seeing a tiny fraction of it over here. For the most part—and this pertains to TV, radio and the internet—the media isn’t better or worse than what we have over here, the major difference is that the people who in some (many) cases manipulate the news are employed by the state, not by private corporations.

      I’m not saying that this isn’t a show move by the CPC, because most Chinese companies have even worse business practices, but with Apple becoming more influential in China, this will certainly benefit consumers over there.

    • http://digitizedsociety.tumblr.com/ DigitizedSociety

      It is a game all companies have to play. China is a major consumer market that many brands/companies are relying on for growth. The companies cannot afford to try and compete in that market and not play these game when their competition will.

  • http://www.lazyprogrammers.com Eugene Kim

    In Asian countries, it’s ALL about saving face.

  • http://blog.charlespinker.com/ Charlie

    This was probably all part of the deal.

  • http://twitter.com/Awax Awax

    So, ONE very specific member of the Communist Part will finally get his iPhone replaced and asked his pundits to stop bashing Apple.

  • MacsenMcBain

    …and the stock is still up a few bucks as of about 1:30 PM EDT. The analysts haven’t found a way to put a negative spin on this yet.