Amplified: Hee-Haw Folks

Jim and Dan talk about truth in reporting, trusting the news and news agencies, android users in the air, twisting numbers, Rubin stepping down, “cheap” guitars, and more.

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  • Dave Brandt

    Jim, you really set Dan on fire today! He was so inflamed that he was late doing the first commercial. That never happens. A few things in life are sacred.

    I think we can shed a little more light on the WSJ thing by putting a few seemingly disparate threads together.

    1) One of the jackals pointed out that the WSJ is now owned by Murdoch. Despite the fact that it still has its own (distinguished) history, it is now a Murdoch rag. It instantly inherited all that (less distinguished) history. One starting point is that they are no more trustworthy than any other Murdoch property.

    2) I bet the old man is still smarting over the fact that iOS customers rejected his bloated, 1950′s style magazine and embraced Mr. Marco’s little squirrel publication. I don’t think the Murdoch empire understands this. Which brings me to more serious points…

    3) The WSJ and all papers are in bad trouble. They’re all losing ground to the internet and the Murdoch magazine showed that they don’t know how to win our business even after investing millions of dollars. They are pressured to appeal strongly to the ever-shrinking subset of the population that is wiling and able to fund the dead tree business. Those have to be readers who are not internet-savvy.

    4) Reputable data indicate that the vast majority of mobile web traffic is from iOS devices. That figure is something like 80%! That’s the internet-savvy crowd. They need to appeal to the remainder — middle and upper class folks who can afford the WSJ and don’t live on the internet.

    The Murdoch empire isn’t going to care about people who get their information from the web and their business analysis from Horace.

    Speaking of Horace, there’s a second-level disruption going on here. First-level is the iPhone changed the cell phone business forever. Second-level is that content providers need to adapt to that change. The Murdoch attempt at an iOS magazine betrayed the fact that they are hardwired to try to sell a print magazine that is distributed to mobile devices. That explains why their pseudo-iOS magazine failed and Mr. Marco bought a high-end bimmer. That’s a terrible change for them.

    It can’t feel good being on the wrong side of a major disruption that affects your life’s work.

  • Dave Brandt

    Jim, you really set Dan on fire today! He was so inflamed that he was late doing the first commercial. That never happens. A few things in life are sacred.

    I think we can shed a little more light on the WSJ thing by putting a few seemingly disparate threads together.

    1) One of the jackals pointed out that the WSJ is now owned by Murdoch. Despite the fact that it still has its own (distinguished) history, it is now a Murdoch rag. It instantly inherited all that (less distinguished) history. One starting point is that they are no more trustworthy than any other Murdoch property.

    2) I bet the old man is still smarting over the fact that iOS customers rejected his bloated, 1950′s style magazine and embraced Mr. Marco’s little squirrel publication. I seriously don’t think the Murdoch empire understands this. Which brings me to more serious points…

    3) The WSJ and all papers are in bad trouble. They’re all losing ground to the internet and the Murdoch magazine showed that they don’t know how to win our business even by investing millions of dollars. Ghey are pressured to appeal strongly to the ever-shrinking subset of the population that is wiling and able to fund the dead tree business. Those have to be readers who are not internet-savvy.

    4) Reputable data indicate that the vast majority of mobile web traffic is from iOS devices. That figure is something like 80%! That’s the internet-savvy crowd. They need to appeal to the remainder — middle and upper class folks who can afford the WSJ and don’t live on the internet.

    The Murdoch empire isn’t going to care about people who get their information from the web and their business analysis from Horace.

    Speaking of Horace, there’s a second-level disruption going on here. First-level is the iPhone changed the cell phone business forever. Second-level is that content providers need to adapt to that change. The Murdoch attempt at an iOS magazine betrayed the fact that they are hardwired to try to sell a print magazine that is distributed to mobile devices. That explains why their pseudo-iOS magazine failed and Mr. Marco bought a high-end bimmer.

    It can’t feel good being on the wrong side of a major disruption that affects your life’s work.