Apple’s consumer technology revenue

Apple’s revenue [19.9%] easily beat out rival Samsung, which came in second with 9.3 percent, up from 7 percent in 2011. The rest of the top five saw their share of revenue fall in 2012: HP dipped from 8.9 percent in 2011 to 8.2 percent last year, while Sony and Dell both slid to 4.4 percent and 3 percent, respectively.

That is an incredible number.



  • http://mangochut.net/ mangochutney

    With this number in mind think about Horace Dediu’s question: “Why does nobody tr to copy Apple’s way of making products?”

    It also brings into stark focus one fact: people are willing to pay for quality.

    • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

      I believe the answer to your first question is “Few conventionally-minded business-school graduates are likely to believe expending that much effort to make high-quality products is necessary to generate such high revenues.”

      • http://twitter.com/studuncan Stu Duncan

        And that is why they never will.

      • http://mangochut.net/ mangochutney

        Unfortunately you’re right. Still it is my belief that we’re starting to see the decline of ‘bullshit companies’. Many of those graduates you’ve mentioned will have to adapt to this new world.

        • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

          I disagree. There are way too many of them in large businesses, not only running things, but consulting for and analyzing those things. There is no new world for them, because they’ve created it and protect each other within it.

          And there is a definite class system, within which it seems perfectly reasonable to retain enormous amounts of redundant management to run an understaffed, underpaid workforce. When seeking to make their businesses more efficient, it’s a rare executive board that cuts exorbitantly-paid vice presidents and hires more low-level staff.

          • http://mangochut.net/ mangochutney

            That I can agree with, without hesitation. Nevertheless I have get the feeling that the market will force some companies to rethink their M.O. or perish.

            One of the things that leads me to believe this is Michael Dell’s liberation of his company from the grip of Wall Street. Something here has me thinking that he’s seen what his company has to become.

            Another thing is that I’ve witnessed some change in the teachings at my university: even some of the old school professors have started to talk more about quality and valuing your customers.

  • Tvaddic

    How does Apple have a higher precentage than Samsung when, Samsung makes more in revenue than Apple?