Microsoft has no “Plan B” for Surface

Given Microsoft’s lack of success so far, he was asked if there was an alternative strategy or ‘Plan B’ in reserve.

“It’s less ‘Plan B’ than how you execute on the current plan,” said Klein. “We aim to evolve this generation of Windows to make sure we have the right set of experiences at the right price points for all customers.”

I have a lot of respect for a company that is so confident in its product line that it goes all in. Having a “plan B” means that in some way you aren’t fully committed to the future of the product.

Of course, if you do that, you better be right. In this case, I’m not sure Microsoft is right.



  • http://f1archives.com/ Gregz0r

    Microsoft should’ve went all-in with Metro – fighting for that name, and trusting it to survive and prosper, on its own, without legacy desktop Windows holding it back.

    • JohnDoey

      What they should have done is Microsoft Office for iOS and possibly Android. Microsoft’s advantage is their size of their software development teams. While many other companies cannot afford to port their software to Windows, Mac, iOS, Android — Microsoft can afford it. Instead it is the Microsoft Office formats that are now going cross-platform, running in non-Microsoft apps.

      They have spent billions on the Web and mobile and had zero success. They pour money down the drain. Selling apps would have made them more money.

      • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

        Isn’t it more accurate to say that Dell has been replaced by Asus?

  • JohnDoey

    The current Surface is the Plan B of the previous Surface, which was a totally different product.

    The current Windows Phone 8 is the Plan B of Windows CE/Mobile, again a completely different product. Windows Phone 8 is based on Windows NT.

    The current Windows 8 is the Plan B of Microsoft Tablet PC, and so is the current Surface.

    Microsoft is all Plan B’s.

  • GTWilson

    “We aim to evolve this generation of Windows to make sure we have the right set of experiences at the right price points for all customers.”

    And with those words, the SS Marketing began her fateful voyage.

  • Steven Fisher

    Stating there’s no plan B is not the same as not having a plan B.

    I’m sure there’s nothing in motion on plan B, but if there isn’t something written down somewhere it’s only because they’re still discussing it, confident they can come up with it if they need it, or they’re complete and utter fools.

  • http://twitter.com/gorskiegangsta Agarun Ilyaguyev

    Microsoft isn’t in a habit of scoring home runs on every swing, as Apple is. They have a history of picking one strategy and sticking with it. If you look back, many of their projects (MS-DOS, Windows, Office, Exchange, IE, Xbox, Bing, MS keyboards/mice, etc..) started as mediocre, but then developed into something good or great. Say what you will, but they’ve largely been able to achieve success using this strategy.

  • http://twitter.com/Moeskido Moeskido

    ” ‘We aim to evolve this generation of Windows’ because we’ve historically needed three tries to make anything work marginally well.”

  • http://www.thegraphicmac.com/ JimD

    Not that I have any faith in MS, but do you really think Apple had a “Plan B” for the iPhone? The iPad? I highly doubt it.

    Like Apple, they probably expected it to be a success and will iterate until it is a success, or it fails so miserably that they just quit and move on to something else (such as they did with the Zune).

  • Dylan Seeger

    How about a “First Response”?….

    HAHAHAHAHAHA (my Jim laugh).

  • Winski

    Surface WAS plan “B”..