UK judge not amused with Apple’s letter to Samsung

I thought the letter was brilliant.



  • Luke

    There’s a fine line between “brilliant” and “childish”. Apple clearly ain’t no Picasso at deciding which side is which.

    • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

      “Childish” is pretending that the term “cool” can be used as an objective measurement regarding an infringement decision and then acting surprised when Apple takes advantage of the situation.

  • http://blog.charlespinker.com/ Charlie

    It was pretty funny. I wonder which bit was actually ‘untrue’. I also wonder if Apple are regretting it now as they probably weren’t hoping for more publicity of this.

    • http://twitter.com/forty2j Jim McPherson

      I was wondering this myself. I don’t believe Apple said one false word in their statement. They mentioned real rulings from other courts and they quoted the real ruling in the UK court.

  • Techpm

    I don’t get how a UK court can demand that Apple withhold relevant facts on other EU cases from their statement.

    Then again I couldn’t understand how the court could take the unprecedented move of demanding that a company post a public notice about the outcome of a patent litigation case.

    For example in the recent Dyson vs Vax case, Dyson was pretty brutal in their comments of Vax copying their designs, but in the end lost the case in this same appeal court. However no notice was required.

    I expect this to end in the European Court of Justice since this is a clear failure of the European patent law system.

    • Techpm

      These wre Sir James Dyson’s words after its Appeal court ruling: “‘The fact of the matter is, I believe the design has been copied. It is mystifying to me why the judges have suggested that it hasn’t,’ he said.”

      Perhaps it’s the “Sir” part that excused them from publishing notices? Maybe Sir Jony can pitch in? :)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MGKMDABPUEAIAYIL5RC6WGE3AY Schuyler

    If the court is keen to implore Apple to reiterate the court’s own comments, perhaps it would behoove the court to mind its words more carefully.

  • http://www.thomasfitzgeraldphotography.com fxgeek

    What I don’t get about his whole thing at all is how it ever happened in the first place. Has there ever been another case of a company failing to win a lawsuit and then being forced to apologize like this? I can’t recall ever having hear of anything like this before. It seems to me the Judge simply has a grudge against Apple.

  • Player_16

    So-su-me!

  • tylernol

    the court was sloppy and not exact enough in their order, and Apple took advantage of it, and now the court is embarrassed. Boo. Hoo.

    • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

      Never mind that the idea of apologising for bringing an infringement case to the court, which Apple had every right to do. Is it really this UK courts opinion that the use of the legal system by a company looking to protect it’s IP is something said company should apologise for?

  • Steven Fisher

    This could be so much fun.

    “We at Apple were ordered by UK courts to apologize for mentioning that other courts had a different outcome than the UK courts, as it made the UK courts seem out of step with the rest of the world.”

  • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

    This has all the makings of a Python skit.

    “Apple would like to apologise for the previous apology and the people who wrote the apology have been sacked. We apologise for apologising inappropriately regarding our apology.”

  • http://www.johncblandii.com John C. Bland II

    I knew he wouldn’t. Called it in the other thread.