One-third of consumers likely to buy an iPhone 5

New research from 451 Research/ChangeWave Research shows that demand for Apple’s new iPhone 5 is strong and will remain that way.

The survey of 4,270 primarily North American consumers shows an “unprecedented degree of consumer interest” in the iPhone 5. Results show that one-in-three people are “Likely” to purchase the new iPhone, while 19% are “Very Likely” and 13% said they were “Somewhat Likely” to buy the iPhone 5.

To put these numbers in perspective, Changewave did the same survey when the iPhone 4S was released and 10% said they were “Very Likely” and 11.5% said they were “Somewhat Likely” to buy.

Even though some reporters made a big deal out of Apple’s change to the Lightning connector in the new iPhone, consumers don’t agree. The majority of respondents said it was “Not Much of a Problem” (31%) or “No Problem At All (26%),” according to the survey.

Of course, the biggest knock on the iPhone 5 so far has been with Maps, but again consumers had a different view. Nine-in-ten users (90%) reported it was “No Problem at All” or they “Haven’t Experienced Any Problem”, while 3% characterized it as a “Very Big Problem” and 6% said it was “Somewhat of a Problem.”



  • Dennis Madrid

    Further proof that the majority of tech news organizations (excluding sites like The Loop, of course) are just like the majority of regular news organizations: so pre-occupied with pushing their own opinions and drawing attention to themselves that they’ve lost sight of what their purpose is–to inform people.

    • http://twitter.com/shycophante Shyco Phante

      My take on this: Tim Cook made a very grave error apologising for a problem that clearly doesn’t exist with Apple Maps.

      • http://www.facebook.com/bobert.baldridge Robert Blair Aldridge

        At this point in the game if Apple releases ANYTHING that isn’t beyond perfection, they will end up apologizing for it. Unless they say ahead of time that it isn’t perfect, like then did for Apple TV and Siri – they said Apple TV was just a ‘hobby’ and Siri was ‘still in Beta’. It might have helped to say Maps would be in beta for a few months post release as they incorporate feedback.

    • Guesty

      Or maybe this survey shows that these news organizations are successful.

      Imagine how many people would mindlessly buy a new iPhone, and assume it’s compatible with all of their existing iPhone hardware and software. The tech news organizations who were alarmist about this were far more effective than Apple at showing people that this changed. Despite Apple’s pride in the new connector, has there been a single advertisement that shows it, even peripherally?

      The company advertises the upsides. The news organizations advertise the downsides. Consumers are well informed, and buy it anyway. That sounds like the system working, to me. I can’t see how the world would be any better if news organizations simply repeated tech specs and marketing claims.

      • http://twitter.com/pmoeser Peter Moeser

        “Despite Apple’s pride in the new connector, has there been a single advertisement that shows it, even peripherally?”

        I take the point of your argument in general, but when has Apple ever advertised their connectors?

        Maybe now they will because they can show how that with the new Lightning connector, the new iPod touch is almost smaller than the previous 30-pin dock connector.

  • http://edwardsung.com/ El Sabor Asiático

    Fandroid spin: Two out of three people hate the iPhone. Apple clearly doomed.

    • http://www.tumblr.com/blog/his-divine-shadow His Shadow

      Well Played.

    • http://www.facebook.com/bobert.baldridge Robert Blair Aldridge

      Dude, it said ‘one-in-three people are “Likely”’, ’19% are “Very Likely”’, and ’13% said they were “Somewhat Likely”’. That totals to 33+19+13 == 65. So 65% are for the iPhone, 35% don’t know or are against iPhone. That isn’t much for Fandroids to go on.

      • http://twitter.com/75th Lanny Heidbreder

        No, that’s incorrect; Jim phrased it very misleadingly. The “Likely” total is the SUM of the “Very likely” and “somewhat likely” numbers: 19 + 13 = 32 total, or roughly 1 in 3.

      • http://twitter.com/75th Lanny Heidbreder

        No, that’s incorrect; Jim phrased it very misleadingly. The “Likely” total is the SUM of the “Very likely” and “somewhat likely” numbers 19 + 13 = 32 total, or roughly 1 in 3.

        Here’s the quote from the actual study:

        “…with one-in-three consumers (32%) saying they’re Likely to buy the iPhone 5 in the future (19% Very Likely; 13% Somewhat Likely).”

        (My original comment got blown away somehow because I edited it too many times; sorry about that.)

        • http://www.facebook.com/bobert.baldridge Robert Blair Aldridge

          I am attempting to get access to the original report then we can duke it out some more. If you are right then the general idea to take away from the blog post is that interest in iPhone is at this moment up roughly 10 percent from about the same time a year ago.

  • superbowlpatriot

    Why is this not surprising at all?

  • Neal O

    I’ve been using Maps, mainly over my TomTom App and the results have been excellent. Apple Maps was never going to have Streetview but I never used that sucessfully on iOS 3, 4 or 5 anyway.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dave.maclachlan.3 Dave MacLachlan

    Just for giggles, use Google Earth to look at Pittsburgh, PA in the US. Look for a large hemisphere shape, it’s some kind of arena that no longer exists. Right by it are a series of waffle-looking melted roads – the exact same kind of problems that have been so lovingly-reported about iOS 6 Maps.

    • Andre Richards

      It doesn’t matter if it’s Google. Everything Google does is in perpetual beta so it’s okay. /s

      • Beta

        I know you’re joking, but Apple’s App Store rules explicitly disallow “beta” software. Google Earth on the iPhone (currently version 7.0.0, 4* rating) uses this data, and there was never any public “beta” version of the app.

        • Cissnel T

          Maybe because the app wasnt in beta – the data was? haha

  • http://www.facebook.com/wayneronaldo143 Bharath Vignesh

    haters can now kiss apple’s american backside!!!haha

  • http://www.facebook.com/wayneronaldo143 Bharath Vignesh

    haters can now kiss apple’s american backside!!!haha

  • Kgbraund

    “Of course, the biggest knock on the iPhone 5 so far has been with Maps, but again consumers had a different view…”

    Lovely pun :)

  • GTWilson

    I guess hyphenating a problem, adding the word “gate” and throwing words like ‘debacle’ around hasn’t had the desired effect.

    The obvious take-away from this is that no-one worth mentioning actually pays attention to the tech press.

    That has to sting a little.