∞ Quicken Financial Life for Mac delayed until 2010

Intuit on Thursday confirmed that Quicken Financial Life for Mac would not be released this year as planned. quickenActually the application was supposed to be released in 2008 when the company first announced it, but later delayed the release until 2009. Apparently that didn’t work out so well either.

Scott Gulbransen, Intuits senior manager of Public Relations/Communications, said on a company blog today that the software would be delayed until February 2010.

“We know you’ve heard this before,” said Gulbransen. “We learned the product was not doing what we – nor customers – wanted it to do. We listened, and we learned.”

Gulbransen said that feedback from customers led the company to rethink its approach to the software. He said Intuit would be working on “a robust Windows-to-Mac transfer function for new Mac users,” among other things.



  • Got tired of waiting and started using MoneyBucket. After inputing six months of transactions, I have to say I prefer it to Quicken. It does everything I need it to do. Very fast, intuitive. No regrets!

  • I would be beholden and grateful to any reviewer — anywhere — who could compare the alternative money-management programs for the (a) most complete feature set and (b) the smoothest import of existing Quicken data.

    I have numbers going back 11 years. I’d very much like to not have to re-input them.

    • Danjswartz

      I agree with Moeskido 110%. I am sick and tired of waiting for Intuit to come up with something close to the features in Quicken for Windows.

      I am downloading and demoing any and all programs that I can find even remotely like Quicken. I have yet to find anything that will import (acurately) so I don’t have to re-input all my data.

  • Joe Anonymous

    “I would be beholden and grateful to any reviewer — anywhere — who could compare the alternative money-management programs for the (a) most complete feature set and (b) the smoothest import of existing Quicken data.”

    I agree, but I’d put 99% of the emphasis on importing existing data. Most people only use a small fraction of the functions in Quicken.

  • “I agree, but I’d put 99% of the emphasis on importing existing data. Most people only use a small fraction of the functions in Quicken.”

    Joe, Moneywell imports and exports .qif files, so data from Quicken can be imported. It’s feature set is limited compared to Quicken, but everything I used in Quicken is there, and it feels less bloated and much quicker to use — iTunes-like. There are other packages out there that may be similar — I remember looking at Moneydance a while ago, but can’t remember why I didn’t jump. Probably would not have bought Moneywell except that it came in a MacUpdate bundle, but after using it would buy it for full price without hesitation.

  • @Joe Anonymous: I’m not necessarily most people. A clean import won’t be very useful to me if the new program doesn’t track loans, brokerage, credit, and bank accounts, easily import downloadable account activity data from such institutions, allow me to generate category reports each year, update stock prices daily… or any of a dozen other things I rely on Quicken for. I don’t use Intuit for online banking; I actually have a bank for that.

    I’ll learn a new interface if I need to, as long as the metaphors aren’t too cute, like “cash envelopes.” I’m hoping some modern-day Cocoa developer out there has applied good graphic design skills to this software category while providing enough features to merit my full attention.

    Nobody I can find is doing anything that looks like a complete feature comparison of these programs, and I haven’t the time to run my own tests on the half dozen apps I’ve already heard of. Every so often, Macworld magazine will rouse itself to a brief discussion of several players, but has never gone the distance with a proper, comprehensive overview of financial management software.

    I want to leave Quicken.